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NFL Brain Injury Lawsuit Moves Forward

News about the traumatic brain injury lawsuits filed against the National Football League keep making headlines. This time, ABC News is reporting that many of the older cases have been consolidated, with a new brain injury lawsuit filed this week which includes more than 2,000 former players. As with all previous suits, the players collectively allege that the league intentionally hid information linking injuries suffered while in the league to long-term brain damage. As our Illinois brain injury attorneys have frequently explained how thousands of former players eventually suffer serious complications as a result of injuries suffered during their playing days.

NFL Lawsuit
This latest consolidated suit has been dubbed ‘the biggest sports lawsuit ever.” Importantly, unlike most injury lawsuits, the players are not necessarily alleging that the NFL directly caused all the injuries. Of course the knocks taken during the course of play and practice led to the harm. Instead, the players are claiming that the injuries were “exacerbated” by the league’s “promoting the game’s violence.”

On top of that, perhaps even more egregiously, the suit claims that league officials “deliberately and fraudulently” misled players about how concussions can lead to long-term brain damage. As we’ve frequently shared on this blog, even seemingly “minor” head injuries can have very serious long-term consequences. The potential for life-altering injuries increases significantly the more significant trauma to the head that a player takes after the initial head injury.

For their part NFL officials have denied all of the allegations. The league was particularly vociferous in denying claims that officials intentionally misled players about injury risk.

However, despite the leagues repeated claims that it never intentionally mislead players, recent high-profile examples continue to tar the NFL’s reputation on this front. Most recently, multiple-time Pro Bowl linebacker Junior Seau committed suicide at age 43 by shooting himself in the chest. Several other former players have done the same thing, leaving notes indicating that they wanted their brain’s donated to the NFL’s “Brain Bank” to study the effects of their playing days. Clearly the player’s themselves believed that their psychological and mental state was adversely affected by injuries caused over years on the field.

The Law
The brain injury attorneys at our firm appreciate that these claims are more than suggestions that the league simply didn’t do enough to stem the injuries. Instead, accessions of promoting the violence of the sport and hiding information are actual overt acts which may have lead thousands of players to suffer injuries that they otherwise would not have suffered.

From a legal standpoint, this is a very significant point. In general, the only way that recovery is had in cases where a third-party fails to act is when there is a special relationship between the injured and the negligent individual (like a doctor-patient relationship). However, there is much more liability when the accusations involve actual overt conduct-like promoting violence or hiding information about long-term injuries. In that way, these accusations made in this suit are quite serious. If proven true, it indicates serious violations which may result in liability.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Head Injury Lawsuit Filed on Behalf of Ex-Football Players https://www.chicagobraininjurylawyerblog.com/2011/09/head_injury_lawsuit_filed_on_b.html
Former Illinois Athletes File Brain Injury Lawsuit Against Eastern Illinois University https://www.chicagobraininjurylawyerblog.com/2011/09/former_illinois_athlete_files.html
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http://commonhealth.wbur.org/2012/06/abc-players-charge-nfl-with-concealing-risk-of-brain-injury-health

NFL Brain Injury Lawsuit Moves Forward

News about the traumatic brain injury lawsuits filed against the National Football League keep making headlines. This time, ABC News is reporting that many of the older cases have been consolidated, with a new brain injury lawsuit filed this week which includes more than 2,000 former players. As with all previous suits, the players collectively allege that the league intentionally hid information linking injuries suffered while in the league to long-term brain damage. As our Illinois brain injury attorneys have frequently explained how thousands of former players eventually suffer serious complications as a result of injuries suffered during their playing days.

NFL Lawsuit This latest consolidated suit has been dubbed ‘the biggest sports lawsuit ever.” Importantly, unlike most injury lawsuits, the players are not necessarily alleging that the NFL directly caused all the injuries. Of course the knocks taken during the course of play and practice led to the harm. Instead, the players are claiming that the injuries were “exacerbated” by the league’s “promoting the game’s violence.”

On top of that, perhaps even more egregiously, the suit claims that league officials “deliberately and fraudulently” misled players about how concussions can lead to long-term brain damage. As we’ve frequently shared on this blog, even seemingly “minor” head injuries can have very serious long-term consequences. The potential for life-altering injuries increases significantly the more significant trauma to the head that a player takes after the initial head injury.

For their part NFL officials have denied all of the allegations. The league was particularly vociferous in denying claims that officials intentionally misled players about injury risk.

However, despite the leagues repeated claims that it never intentionally mislead players, recent high-profile examples continue to tar the NFL’s reputation on this front. Most recently, multiple-time Pro Bowl linebacker Junior Seau committed suicide at age 43 by shooting himself in the chest. Several other former players have done the same thing, leaving notes indicating that they wanted their brain’s donated to the NFL’s “Brain Bank” to study the effects of their playing days. Clearly the player’s themselves believed that their psychological and mental state was adversely affected by injuries caused over years on the field.

The Law The brain injury attorneys at our firm appreciate that these claims are more than suggestions that the league simply didn’t do enough to stem the injuries. Instead, accessions of promoting the violence of the sport and hiding information are actual overt acts which may have lead thousands of players to suffer injuries that they otherwise would not have suffered.

From a legal standpoint, this is a very significant point. In general, the only way that recovery is had in cases where a third-party fails to act is when there is a special relationship between the injured and the negligent individual (like a doctor-patient relationship). However, there is much more liability when the accusations involve actual overt conduct-like promoting violence or hiding information about long-term injuries. In that way, these accusations made in this suit are quite serious. If proven true, it indicates serious violations which may result in liability.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Head Injury Lawsuit Filed on Behalf of Ex-Football Players

Former Illinois Athletes File Brain Injury Lawsuit Against Eastern Illinois University